Ralph Randal (Randy) Bollinger Oral History Interviews, 1994, 1995

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Summary

Creator:
Bollinger, Randall
Abstract:
Dr. Ralph Randal (Randy) Bollinger, MD, a surgeon who spent his entire professional career at Duke, was appointed to the surgery faculty in 1980 and appointed Chief of Transplantation in 1983. He was instrumental in the development of liver and pancreas transplantation, participating in the first liver transplant at Duke, and pioneering the technical, immunological, and logistical complexities of these burgeoning operations. This collection contains 2 oral history interviews conducted on July 21, 1994 and November 28, 1995 by Dr. James Gifford. Both interviews are included in the Dr. David Sabiston Oral History Project. In the July 21, 1994 interview Bollinger discusses his career as a surgeon, his research interests, and the work of his laboratory within the structure of the Department of Surgery. In the November 28, 1995 interview Bollinger discusses his work as Chief of the Division of General Surgery.
Extent:
2 Interviews (2 transcripts, 3 audiocassette tapes)
Collection ID:
OH.BOLLINGERR

Background

Scope and content:

Includes 2 oral history interview with Dr. Ralph Randal (Randy) Bollinger conducted on July 21, 1994 and November 28, 1995 by Dr. James Gifford. Both interviews are included in the Dr. David Sabiston Oral History Project.

In the July 21, 1994 interview Bollinger discusses his career as a surgeon, his research interests, and the work of his laboratory within the structure of the Department of Surgery.

In the November 28, 1995 interview Bollinger discusses his work as Chief of the Division of General Surgery.

Biographical / historical:

Dr. Ralph Randal (Randy) Bollinger, MD, PhD, was born in Dearborn, Michigan, on October 3, 1944. He graduated cum laude from Tulane University with a BS in Biology (1966). During college, he spent a year in the Department of Biology at Universitat Tubingen, in Tubingen, Baden-Wurttemburg, Germany, where he performed research in the laboratory of Professor Karl Grell. Bollinger then went to Tulane Medical School, where he was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society and earned a MS in Biochemistry. He received both his MD and MS in 1970. His interests in immunology and organ transplantation were nurtured by Dr. John C. McDonald, the surgical director of transplantation at Charity Hospital in New Orleans.

Recognizing Bollinger's immense potential, Dr. David Sabiston, Jr., Chair of Surgery at Duke University, hired him as a categorical general surgery resident in 1970. His residency was interrupted by two years of service to his country in the United States Air Force, after which he returned to Duke to complete the General Surgery Residency Training Program. Despite the rigorous clinical training, Bollinger was able to complete the requirements for a PhD in Immunology in the laboratory of Drs. D. Bernard Amos and David W. Scott (1977). He was appointed to the surgery faculty in 1980 and was appointed Chief of Transplantation in 1983.

Bollinger spent his entire professional career at Duke, where he became known as much for his character and compassion as his surgical expertise and research accomplishments. His ability to maintain a pleasant and calm demeanor during challenging operations and long sleepless nights was renowned. He was instrumental in the development of liver and pancreas transplantation, participating in the first liver transplant at Duke, and pioneering the technical, immunological, and logistical complexities of these burgeoning operations. He developed a national reputation in transplantation, serving as councilor of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, president of the South-Eastern Organ Procurement Foundation (the nation's first organ procurement body), and ultimately president of the United Network for Organ Sharing. As a researcher, Bollinger directed a transplant immunology laboratory in which he mentored numerous future transplant thought leaders.

Bollinger won virtually every teaching award offered by Duke University School of Medicine, including the Golden Apple (1984 and 1989), Distinguished Teacher Award (1989), and the David C. Sabiston, Jr. Teaching Award (1987). He authored over 150 peer-reviewed publications in high impact journals. Bollinger served as Chief of the Division of General Surgery, and on the university's Academic Council. In addition to his other degrees and accomplishments, he earned an MBA from the Fuqua School of Business (1997) and maintained a robust clinical practice in the surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease. Bollinger reached the ranks of Professor of Surgery and Professor of Immunology.

In 2016, by virtue of his exceptional contributions to Duke Surgery, Bollinger was recognized as a true Master Surgeon. This honor is bestowed to establish a living memory of an individual who has embodied the ideals of Duke Surgery, with the expectation that reflection on this illustrious career will serve as a guidepost for those aspiring to a life in the art and science of surgery.

Acquisition information:
Accession A1994.003 (transferred by Dr. James Gifford, July 1994), No documented accession number (transferred by James Gifford, November 1995)
Processing information:

Processed by Archives staff: date unknown; updated by Lucy Waldrop: March 2023

Arrangement:
Organized into the following series: Interview, July 21, 1994; Interview, November 28, 1995.
Rules or conventions:
DACS

Contents

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Restrictions:

None.

Terms of access:

Copyright for Official University records is held by Duke University; all other copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Preferred citation:

[Identification of item], Ralph Randal (Randy) Bollinger Oral History Interviews, Duke University Medical Center Archives.