William C. Meyers Oral History Interviews, 1994-2019

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Restrictions:
May 4, 1994 interview: restrictions apply. Contact the Medical Center Archivist for more information.February 27, 2019 interview: Use transcript and use audio are available for researchers.
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Summary

Creator:
Meyers, William C., M.D. and Duke University. Medical Center. Department of Surgery.
Abstract:
Dr. William C. Meyers, MD, dedicated his career to pioneering the diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of core muscle injuries, formerly known as athletic pubalgia or sports hernia. He completed his residency and fellowship at Duke University subsequently serving 14 years as Chief for various divisions of surgery prior to leaving Duke. This collection contains 2 oral history interviews conducted on May 8, 1994 by Dr. James Gifford and February 27, 2019 by Dr. Justin Barr. In the 1994 interview, Meyers discusses the Gastrointestinal Research Lab. In the 2019 interview, which is part of the Dr. David Sabiston Oral History Project, Meyers reflects on his time as an undergraduate at Harvard and his early interest in journalism; experiences as a soccer player; medical school at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons; his residency at Duke; experiences with Sabiston; decision to stay at Duke after residency; experience as the program director of the residency program; Chace Lottich, the first female in Duke Surgery; preforming the first liver transplant at Duke and setting up the third liver transplant program in the country; preforming the first laparoscopic surgery at Duke; and leaving Duke for the University of Massachusetts Medical School and UMASS Health System.
Extent:
2 interviews (3 transcripts, 1 audio cassette tape) and 126.92 MB
Collection ID:
OH.MEYERSB

Background

Scope and content:

Includes 2 oral history interviews with Dr. William C. Meyers conducted on May 8, 1994 by Dr. James Gifford and February 27, 2019 by Dr. Justin Barr.

In the May 8, 1994 interview Meyers discusses the Gastrointestinal Research Lab.

In the February 27, 2019 interview, which is part of the Dr. David Sabiston Oral History Project, Meyers reflects on his time as an undergraduate at Harvard and his early interest in journalism; experiences as a soccer player; medical school at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons; his residency at Duke; experiences with Sabiston; decision to stay at Duke after residency; experience as the program director of the residency program; Chace Lottich, the first female in Duke Surgery; preforming the first liver transplant at Duke and setting up the third liver transplant program in the country; preforming the first laparoscopic surgery at Duke; and leaving Duke for the University of Massachusetts Medical School and UMASS Health System.

Biographical / historical:

Dr. William Clark Meyers, MD, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts. He graduated from the Choate School in Wallingford, Connecticut (1967) and Harvard University with a BA in the History of Science (1971). He received an MD from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons (1975), and he completed his residency at Duke in the Surgery Residency Program (1983), where he received training in general, thoracic, vascular, transplantation surgery, and liver physiology. He received his MBA from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania (2003).

His surgical and basic science training at Duke University Medical Center is listed as followed: Intern in Surgery (1975-1976), Assistant Resident in General and Thoracic Surgery 1976-1982), Research Associate in Gastroenterology (1977-1979), Fellow in Gastrointestinal Research (1977-1983), Vascular Surgery Training (1981-1982), and Chief Resident in Surgery (1982-1983).

After completing his residency and fellowship at Duke University, he served for 14 years as Chief for various divisions of surgery before leaving Duke for the University of Massachusetts where he was Chairman of Surgery and Surgeon-in-Chief at University of Massachusetts-Worcester. He served as Professor, Chairman of Surgery and Senior Associate Dean at Drexel University College of Medicine from January 2001 until November of 2010. In 2013, Meyers established Vincera Institute, a center dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, research and education of core injuries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Meyers has dedicated his career to pioneering the diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of core muscle injuries, formerly known as athletic pubalgia or sports hernia. Meyers led the awareness that the whole core muscle complex, inclusive with the hip joint, contributes to the injury which has advanced old terminology such as athletic pubalgia or sports hernia. Treating patients with abdominal or groin injuries stemmed from a unique experience in the 1980s with the U.S. National Soccer Team, Miami Dolphins, and various Olympic athletes. Since then, he has developed a number of variants of the surgical repair for core muscle injuries (athletic pubalgia/sports hernia) and their relationship to the ball and socket hip joint. He has evaluated over 15,000 patients, including professional players from the National Football League, National Hockey League, National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, Professional Tennis, Professional Golf, Professional Bull Riding, Swimming, Olympic Track and Field, collegiate and recreational athletes.

Meyers has held academic appointments at Duke University, Durham VA Medical Center, Cabarrus County Hospital, Durham County General Hospital, Womack Army Hospital, UMASS Memorial Health Care System, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Drexel University College of Medicine, and Jefferson Medical College.

Meyers is a member of numerous medical societies, as well as holding a number of society officeships and acting as a reviewer or editorial board member. He has received many awards and honors throughout his career including Duke University Medical Student Golden Apple Award (1995), Yugoslavian Surgery Award (1998), Peruvian Surgical Society Award (1999), Mass Medical Device Industry Annual Leadership Award (1999), University of Massachusetts Medical Student Golden Apple Award (1999, 2000), University of Massachusetts McCready Award for Resident Teaching (1999, 2000), Wharton MBA Class Valedictorian Address (2003), American Hepatobiliary Association Founder's Presidential Honoree (2005), Named "Top Doc" by Philadelphia Magazine, American Gastroenterological Association Fellow (2008), and Healthcare Innovator Award (2015). He has authored and co-authored over 300 peer reviewed medical publications, written chapters and edited text, and written 2 books.

Meyers has 2 children.

Acquisition information:
Accession A1994.018 (transferred by James Gifford, May 1994), Accession A2019.041 (transferred by Justin Barr, May 2019), Accession A2024.001 (transferred by Mary-Russell Roberson, January 2024)
Processing information:

Processed by Archives staff: 1994; updated by Lucy Waldrop: May 2019, January 2024

Arrangement:
Organized into the following series: Interview, May 8, 1994; Interview, February 27, 2019.
Rules or conventions:
DACS

Contents

Using These Materials

Using These Materials Links:

Using These Materials


Restrictions:

May 4, 1994 interview: restrictions apply. Contact the Medical Center Archivist for more information.

February 27, 2019 interview: Use transcript and use audio are available for researchers.

Terms of access:

Copyright for Official University records is held by Duke University; all other copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Preferred citation:

William C. Meyers Oral History Interviews, Duke University Medical Center Archives.